Monthly Archives: December 2016

Hag Seed – Margaret Atwood

Hag Seed – Margaret Atwood

I don’t think I have read an Atwood novel that I haven’t liked. So I was keen to read this – I did ask at my local Dymocks and they hadn’t heard of it, which is very upsetting. Anyway this is a re-telling of Shakespeare’s The Tempest (part of the Hogarth Shakespeare project). I know nothing about The Tempest, so I read the wikipedia summary (although having read that I think The Collector by John Fowles might have some Tempest allusions – there is a Miranda, a man who wants to be called Ferdinand, but gets called Caliban – I do wonder now what my English Lit teacher was thinking not to mention Shakespeare?)

Here’s the blurb …

The Tempest is set on a remote island full of strange noises and creatures. Here, Prospero, the deposed Duke of Milan, plots to restore the fortunes of his daughter Miranda by using magic and illusion — starting with a storm that will bring Antonio, his treacherous brother, to him. All Prospero, the great sorcerer, needs to do is watch as the action he has set in train unfolds.

In Margaret Atwood’s ‘novel take’ on Shakespeare’s original, theatre director Felix has been unceremoniously ousted from his role as Artistic Director of the Makeshiweg Theatre. When he lands a job teaching theatre in a prison, the possibility of revenge presents itself — and his cast find themselves taking part in an interactive and illusion-ridden version of The Tempest that will change their lives forever.

I found this to be quite the page turner – and I am quite sure I wouldn’t have found the original to be so enthralling.

It is such a clever, fun, modern interpretation (and the prisoners offer insightful commentary about the original).

As with all Atwood novels, it is beautifully written – her choice of words is extraordinary (it must be the poet in her). I wish she would write for the Austen project, which apart from Northanger Abbey has been quite disappointing.

More reviews …

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/oct/16/hag-seed-review-margaret-atwood-tempest-hogarth-shakespeare

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/review/shakespeare-goes-under-margaret-atwoods-microscope-in-hagseed/news-story/d21be2b437ca5c86a5f2365b1d08747d

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Every Good Deed and Other Stories by Dorothy Whipple

Every Good Deed and Other Stories – Dorothy Whipple

I love Persephone books – I don’t think I have had a disappointing book yet.  For some reason I hadn’t bought one for a while, so I had slipped off the Persephone Biannually list, but when I heard there was a new Dorothy Whipple I had to get it. And then clearly I had to buy another two to get the discount postage – Miss Buncle Married and Fidelity.

Here is the blurb (or what it has on the inside cover – it is an excerpt from one of the stories)…

She sighed heavily and looked unseeingly out of the window, crushed with the boredom of being where she was, of being a widow, of not being invited anywhere for this fortnight. ‘It’s cutlet for cutlet,’ she thought bitterly. ‘I can’t entertain, so no one entertains me now. To think that I should have come to a place like this. After the life,’ she thought, ‘I’ve lived.’

She closed her eyes against the dining room, but opened them again on being addressed by Maud.

‘D’you want the mayonnaise?’ asked Maud truculently, bringing it.

‘Out of a bottle?’ said Mrs Moore. ‘No’.

Maud went out of the dining room, but spoke in a loud voice in the passage outside.

‘It’s a quarter-past two and my afternoon off,’ she said. ‘I’m not going to stand this, so you know, Mrs Pink. I’ve no need to.’

These are beautifully written stories about ordinary (and the occasionally  malicious) people. These stories were published between 1935 and 1961 and are of their time and about a certain class (middle) of English society. Don’t assume it is all tea drinking and scone eating – people are people wherever you find them. They are selfish, self-centred, vicious, kind, generous and self-sacrificing.

These novels are for people who are more interested in character than plot.

Here is the Persephone page for Every Good Deed

Here is a review from the Book Snob about one of the stories – Every Good Deed

And another review …

Every Good Deed and Other Stories – Dorothy Whipple – a new Persephone!

 

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Our Souls at Night – Kent Haruf

Our Souls at Night – Kent Haruf

I love Kent Haruf’s novels – slow burning stories about the human spirit. So I was keen to read this his last novel.

Here is the blurb …

Addie Moore’s husband died years ago, so did Louis Waters’ wife, and, as neighbours in Holt, Colorado they have naturally long been aware of each other. With their children now far away both live alone in houses empty of family. The nights are terribly lonely, especially with no one to talk to. Then one evening Addie pays Louis an unexpected visit.
Their brave adventures – their pleasures and their difficulties – form the beating heart of Our Souls at Night. Kent Haruf’s final novel is a moving story about love and growing old with grace.

This is a beautiful story about the loneliness of old-age, but also about reaching out to connect with someone – the courage required and the rewards involved (a new lease on life). It is also about the expectations placed on us by our communities and our families.

The writing is (as always) beautiful – certainly not showy, but eloquent in its simplicity.

More reviews …

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/may/27/our-souls-at-night-kent-haruf-review

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The Atomic Weight of Love – Elizabeth J Church

The Atomic Weight of Love – Elizabeth J Church

I bought this book with a gift voucher for my birthday – it was all about the cover.

Here is the blurb …

In her sweeping debut novel, Elizabeth J. Church takes us from the World War II years in Chicago to the vast sun-parched canyons of New Mexico in the 1970s as we follow the journey of a driven, spirited young woman, Meridian Wallace, whose scientific ambitions are subverted by the expectations of her era.
In 1941, at seventeen years old, Meridian begins her ornithology studies at the University of Chicago. She is soon drawn to Alden Whetstone, a brilliant, complicated physics professor who opens her eyes to the fundamentals and poetry of his field, the beauty of motion, space and time, the delicate balance of force and energy that allows a bird to fly.
Entranced and in love, Meridian defers her own career path and follows Alden west to Los Alamos, where he is engaged in a secret government project (later known to be the atomic bomb). In married life, though, she feels lost and left behind. She channels her academic ambitions into studying a particular family of crows, whose free life and companionship are the very things that seem beyond her reach. There in her canyons, years later at the dawn of the 1970s, with counterculture youth filling the streets and protests against the war rupturing college campuses across the country, Meridian meets Clay, a young geologist and veteran of the Vietnam War, and together they seek ways to mend what the world has broken.
Exquisitely capturing the claustrophobic eras of 1940s and 1950s America, The Atomic Weight of Love also examines the changing roles of women during the decades that followed. And in Meridian Wallace we find an unforgettable heroine whose metamorphosis shows how the women’s movement opened up the world for a whole generation.

I found the science part of this novel interesting – experiments with radioactive material involving bare hands and a screwdriver! The sections on the crows and how they work as communities, mate for life and are clever was fascinating.

The relationship between Alden and Meridian was well-portrayed. It started so successfully but they were of different times and had different expectations of marriage. Although, in much the way it usually happens, the things that drew them together eventually drove them apart. The relationship with Clay was weaker and a bit cliched and for me the final third of the novel was not as strong as the first two-thirds. It started with such promise and I think it is a sign of better things to come from Ms Church.

It was an interesting read and I look forward to reading her next novel.

Another review …

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/the-atomic-weight-of-love-review-fledgling-feminism-1.2812164

 

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Crossing to Safety – Wallace Stegner

Crossing to Safety - Wallace Stegner

Crossing to Safety – Wallace Stegner

This was such a fabulous book and I am yet to hear a dissenting voice on how good it is.

Here is the blurb …

When two young couples meet for the first time during the Great Depression, they quickly find they have much in common: Charity Lang and Sally Morgan are both pregnant, while their husbands Sid and Larry both have jobs in the English department at the University of Wisconsin. Immediately a lifelong friendship is born, which becomes increasingly complex as they share decades of love, loyalty, vulnerability and conflict. Written from the perspective of the aging Larry Morgan, Crossing to Safety is a beautiful and deeply moving exploration of the struggle of four people to come to terms with the trials and tragedies of everyday life.

It is beautifully written – understated and simple, but brilliant.  It is unusual to read a novel about marriage that isn’t about just starting out or ending in disaster. However, this novel is about more than that – it is about living the good life (in the moral sense), how to contribute to the world, about writing and reading (perhaps that is why all readers like it?), women’s role in the world (Poor Charity has to live vicariously through her husband) and finally it is about what makes a good death and who gets to decide that – the dying or those left behind.

I can’t recommend this book highly enough.

More reviews …

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/reviews/my-book-of-a-lifetime-crossing-to-safety-by-wallace-stegner-1051770.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1987/09/20/books/the-grace-of-old-lovers.html

Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner

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